Beard House Recipe: Salt-Roasted Celery Root with Horseradish Cheese Curds, Meyer Lemon Vinaigrette, and Benne Seed Crumble

 

Salt-Roasted Celery Root with Horseradish Cheese Curds, Meyer Lemon Vinaigrette, and Benne Seed Crumble / New England Winter

 

Wintertime, the stingiest of times for Mother Nature, can be something of a Rorschach test for chefs and food lovers: some see the season as a period of deprivation and tedium, while others see an opportunity for resourcefulness and creativity. JBF Award semifinalist Tyler Anderson falls in the latter camp. At a recent Beard House dinner, the Connecticut-based chef served a dish of... Read more >

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On the Menu: Week of December 7

 

Here’s what’s coming up at the James Beard House and around the country:


Monday, December 7, 7:00 P.M.

New England Winter

Millwright’s Restaurant and Tavern has become something of a New England food lover’s magnet, thanks to the talents of JBF Award semifinalist Tyler Anderson, whose rustic yet elegant cuisine has earned wide acclaim, including a rave review from the New York Times.

 

Wednesday, December 9, 12:00 P.M.

Beard on Books

JBF Award winner Sarabeth Levine knows a thing or two about brunch. For over 35 years diners have been queuing up outside her restaurants to sample her signature muffins, pancakes, scones, and more. In her latest cookbook, Sarabeth’s Good Mornings, Levine shares insights on... Read more >

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Eat This Word: Sorghum

 

WHAT? Sugar in the rough. Before refined sugar was popularized in America around the time of World War I, sorghum syrup was a common sweetener that was used on pancakes or in baking. Its use was so widespread that it was known as "the sugar of the Plains." The juice is extracted from the stalks of the sorghum plant and, like maple syrup, is boiled down. Today, you can find sorghum syrup, which is far better for you than refined sugar, at health food stores. Other varieties of the sorghum plant furnish a millet-like grain, used in porridge, breads, and soups in many parts of the world. In the United States, however, despite the grain's reputation as "a powerhouse of nutrition," (Food Lover's Companion) it is mostly used for animal fodder.

 

WHERE? New England Winter

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On the Menu: April 25 through May 1

Here’s what’s happening at the Beard House next week: Monday, April 26, 7:00 P.M. Sustainable Seafood Feast At the intimate Copper Beech Inn, acclaimed executive chef Tyler Anderson finds inspiration in the Connecticut River Valley, creating New England–inflected modern American dishes. An alum of Vermont’s Equinox and Colorado’s RockResorts, Anderson has designed a magnificent menu for this feast, pairing pristine local produce with the finest sustainable seafood. Tuesday, April 27, 7:00 P.M. Le Cirque Spectacular Though the recent multimillion-dollar reopening of Le Cirque marked a new era in the storied restaurant’s 30-

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Eat this Word: Pain Perdu

WHAT? Leftover loaf. To make pain perdu, or "lost bread," stale slices of baguette or brioche are revived by a soak in an egg and milk bath and then browned in butter until crisp. We know it as French toast in the U.S., but versions of this custardy concoction can be found throughout most of Europe. In Portugal, the dish is called rabanadas; in Spain, families tuck into honey-coated torrijas; and in England the strangely named "poor knights of Windsor" has been a delicacy since the 17th-century (when it was often doused in wine and finished with almond milk). Pain perdu's origins are unknown, but a similar recipe appears in the writings of Roman chef Apicius from the first century A.D.. Today, New Orleans chefs have claimed pain perdu as their own, adding cinnamon and vanilla to the egg mixture and serving the dish with a sprinkling of powdered sugar and a dollop of jam

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